The Inner Ramayana
Indian religions

The Inner Ramayana

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(This blog has been written with the assumption that the reader knows the story of Ramayana and various vedic terminologies.)

Truth, considered single faceted by humans, is in fact multidimensional in nature, just like a diamond with many facets. The light of divinity when passing through this diamond emits myriad reflections of colors and rays.

Divine epics like the Ramayana and Mahabharata cannot be viewed as mere moral stories conveying assorted virtues as displayed in the lives of it’s characters. There is more to it than meets the eye. Mahabharata may be considered the story of the virtuous Pandavas who with the help of Krishna emerge victorious in the battle against the Kauravas to regain their rightful inheritance of Hastinapur and Indraprasth. But at another level Mahabharata is also the story of an ideal devotee (Arjuna/Pandavas) guided by the inner Guru (Krishna) in the battlefield of life (Kurukshetra) against the Ego guided samskaras and desires (Kauravas) to attain Moksha (Hastinapur).

Dasharatha is the king of Ayodhya, ruling along with his three wives Kausalya, Sumitra and Kaikeyi.
Dashratha is the Ego/mind, custodian of the 10 senses – five inner five outer (Dasha – ten, Ratha – chariot of 10 horses or senses).
His three queens are the three gunas which guide the mind –
Kausalya representing Sattwa (Pure),
Sumitra representing Rajas (Activating),
Kaikeyi representing Tamas (Dull or impure).

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Divine epics like the Ramayana and Mahabharata cannot be viewed as mere moral stories conveying assorted virtues as displayed in the lives of it’s characters. There is more to it than meets the eye. Mahabharata may be considered the story of the virtuous Pandavas who with the help of Krishna emerge victorious in the battle against the Kauravas to regain their rightful inheritance of Hastinapur and Indraprasth. But at another level Mahabharata is also the story of an ideal devotee (Arjuna/Pandavas) guided by the inner Guru (Krishna) in the battlefield of life (Kurukshetra) against the Ego guided samskaras and desires (Kauravas) to attain Moksha (Hastinapur).

Divine epics like the Ramayana and Mahabharata cannot be viewed as mere moral stories conveying assorted virtues as displayed in the lives of it’s characters. There is more to it than meets the eye. Mahabharata may be considered the story of the virtuous Pandavas who with the help of Krishna emerge victorious in the battle against the Kauravas to regain their rightful inheritance of Hastinapur and Indraprasth. But at another level Mahabharata is also the story of an ideal devotee (Arjuna/Pandavas) guided by the inner Guru (Krishna) in the battlefield of life (Kurukshetra) against the Ego guided samskaras and desires (Kauravas) to attain Moksha (Hastinapur).

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